• All volunteers, chaperones and field trip attendees must submit information for a criminal history record search. All information is submitted electronically at:

    Following Texas Education Code § 22.083, the Deer Park Independent School District obtains criminal history record information (yearly, regardless if obtained previous school year) from all applicants who wish to volunteer in public schools.

    Deer Park ISD District policy GKG [LEGAL] states, in part, that “a volunteer may not perform any volunteer duties until:

    1. The volunteer has provided to the campus a driver’slicense or another form of identification containing the person’s photograph issued by an entity of the United States government. Identification must be provided upon arrival at the campus office each day on which the person volunteers; and
    2. The District has obtained from the Texas Department of Public Safety (DPS) and may obtain from any other law enforcement agency, criminal justice agency, or private consumer reporting agency all criminal history record information that relates to a volunteer.”
      In cases where a volunteer has a criminal record, the District looks at a number of criteria when determining whether or not to allow the person to volunteer in DPISD.  These include the nature of the crime, the number of crimes, when the crime(s) occurred, and more.

    The following individuals cannot volunteer in DPISD:

    • A person convicted of a crime involving children [i.e. possession of child pornography]
    • A person convicted of a serious crime, including, but not limited to murder, aggravated assault, armed robbery, etc.
    • A person who has committed three or more crimes within the last five years*
    • A person who has committed a felony conviction during the last five years
    • A person currently serving probation for any crime

    *For these guidelines, the District will not consider routine traffic-related violations such as speeding, running a red light, or parking tickets.

    Other individuals who have a criminal record will be considered on a case-by-case basis, and, although a person who has committed a misdemeanor could volunteer in a school, the nature of the crime could limit the volunteer role that person could have.  For example, a person convicted of misdemeanor theft could be restricted from access to Parent-Teacher Organization funds.